​​AASHTO Subcommittee on Transportation Systems Management and Operations

 

Motiani Named Executive Director for New National Operations Center of Excellence
​AASHTO announced that Dennis Motiani, a well-known expert in transportation systems management and operations, will be executive director for the new National Operations Center of Excellence to be housed adjacent to AASHTO's Washington, D.C., offices. Read more in the November 7, 2014, AASHTO Journal Article​.

Develop Connected Vehicle Guidance To Meet Your Needs.
USDOT is seeking your input on the Proposed FHWA 2015 Guidance for Connected Vehicles and the Formation of a V2I Deployment Coalition

Draft Guidance Is Available for Review: The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) plans to produce deployment guidance in 2015 on connected vehicles (CV) to transportation infrastructure owner/operators.  Initial guidance is posted on the website below.  Tell us what would best support decision making and deployments at the state and local level. USDOT is seeking feedback from State and local Departments of Transportation, transit operators, other operating agencies, and infrastructure owners who are starting to plan for the deployment and use of connected vehicle technologies in their area. Any interested parties may provide comments on the initial draft guidance through November 14, 2014.

How Would A Deployment Coalition Help You?  National Associations including AASHTO, ITE and ITS America are working together to form a Vehicle to Infrastructure (V2I) Deployment Coalition.  What type of organization will best meet your needs?  

Review source materials and provide comments at: http://www.its.dot.gov/meetings/v2i_feedback.htm​ by Friday, November 14, 2014.


Operations in the 21st Century - Presentations for DOTs and MPOs (Updated November 14, 2014)

  • Operations in the 21st Century – Meeting Customer Needs and Expectations – An adaptable power point presentation​ and an accompanying​ presentation guide document are available for your use. The material is geared for presentation to the chief executive officers (CEOs) and senior managers of state departments of transportation (DOTs) about the value of mainstreaming transportation systems management and operations as a core mission, business practice, and investment priority in their respective agencies. Additionally, the presentation materials may also be used to discuss the importance of operations to middle management and other DOT staff (e.g., maintenance staff, planning and budgeting, design) as may be appropriate. The goals of these tools include promoting an understanding and appreciation for what "operations" can do to help a DOT meet today's many challenges and improve the transportation network. The executive audience needs to understand policy-related issues and basic concepts in order to become advocates for operations. The second hoped-for result is that the executive(s) will then task their senior staff to formalize operations as a core DOT program and an on-going focus within the agency and the region.
  • Regional Operations in the 21st Century – A Vital Role for MPOs – An​  adaptable power point presentation​and an accompanying​ presentation guide document are available for your use. The material is geared for presentation to the chief executive officers (CEOs) and senior managers of MPOs and to the MPO's board members about the value of mainstreaming transportation systems management and operations as a core component and investment priority in the regional transportation planning process. The goals of these tools are to promote an understanding and appreciation for what "operations" can do to help transportation agencies within a region meet today's many challenges and improve the transportation network. The executive audience needs to understand policy-related issues and basic concepts in order to become advocates for operations. The second hoped-for result is that the executive(s) will then task their senior staff to formalize operations as an integral part of the transportation planning process (using an objectives-driven performance based approach) and an on-going focus within the various transportation agencies and local governments within the region.
  • Should any presenter identify materials and information that should be included in the presentation materials, or develop a modified order of the slides that has proven beneficial, please contact Steve Clinger of FHWA at Stephen.Clinger@dot.gov.​

Transportation Systems Management and Operations Guidance (http://www.aashtotsmoguidance.org/

This website and its guidance is designed for transportation agency managers whose span of control relates to the operations and management of the roadway system, including policy makers and program managers related to ITS and TSM&O at both the state and regional level, as well as managers of systems operations related activities such as traffic engineering, maintenance, and public safety. The guidance can be used to evaluate agency capabilities in key areas of process and institutional arrangements and to prepare a formal action plan. A self-evaluation customizes the guidance based on current agency capability.


​Mainstreaming Operations Into Transportation

Business Plan: Mainstreaming Systems Operations in State DOTs (PDF)
This report presents a five-year business plan to "mainstream" systems operations and management in state DOTs. It describes briefly the Subcommittee's 2005 workshop activities in production of the Plan. While the plan is focused principally within the AASHTO community, close cooperation with other entities fostering mainstream, such as the National Transportation Operations Coalition, TRB, FHWA, and National Traffic Incident Management Coalition is included. The Workshop and Business Plan were developed as part of NCHRP Project 20-7 (188).

The 21st Century Operations-Oriented State DOT (PDF)

Guide for Emergency Transportation Operations

These guides are designed to support the development of a formal program for the improved management of traffic incidents, natural disasters, security events, and other emergencies on the highway system. It outlines a coordinated, performance-oriented, all-hazard approach called “Emergency Transportation Operations.” The concept of this guidance has grown out of discussion within the National Transportation Incident Management Coalition (NTIMC) that brings together the combined perspectives of the transportation and public safety communities.

 

Optimizing the System

Optimizing is defined as "improving or developing to the greatest extent possible." Optimizing the system describes the mission embraced by most state departments of transportation as they seek the ultimate in the safe and efficient operation of the transportation network we have today.

The need to optimize our transportation system springs from the recognition that growth in demand has far outstripped our ability to provide adequate new capacity. Between 1980 and 1999, the number of vehicle miles traveled on America’s roads and highways increased by 76 percent, while capacity grew by only 1.5 percent. Expert analysis estimates that less than half of the new roadway that was needed to handle even current levels of traffic was added in that time.

Our goal must be to make the system work better, safer, and smarter, to both save lives and save time for our citizens. There is no single solution to this challenge, there are many, from the rapid clearing of traffic accidents, to advising motorists of traffic tie-ups or weather delays, to improving highway work zones for the safety of both drivers and workers. There is a tremendous amount of technology that can be deployed, and models that can be used. This AASHTO report showcases examples of what is working well in states across the country.

There are also exciting opportunities within our reach in the next decade. AASHTO is working with the nation’s auto industry and the federal government to create a new capability in which vehicles collect and communicate traffic and roadway information to other drivers and to transportation operators. The potential payoffs—in lives saved and delays avoided—are dramatic. The technology is achievable, the incentives are high, and all that is needed is the commitment to work cooperatively to achieve this quantum leap forward.

More Links and Information

FHWA: Traffic Congestion and Reliability: Linking Solutions to Problems

The Traffic Congestion and Reliability: Linking Solutions to Problems Report provides a snapshot of congestion in the United States by summarizing recent trends in congestion, highlighting the role of unreliable travel times in the effects of congestion, and describing efforts to curb congestion. In particular, the Report develops a framework for understanding the various sources of congestion, the ways to address congestion by targeting these sources, and performance measures for monitoring trends in congestion.

TTI: 2007 Urban Mobility Report

Traffic congestion continues to worsen in American cities of all sizes, creating a $78 billion annual drain on the U.S. economy in the form of 4.2 billion lost hours and 2.9 billion gallons of wasted fuel—that's 105 million weeks of vacation and 58 fully-loaded supertankers.

These are among the key findings of the Texas Transportation Institute's 2007 Urban Mobility Report. Improvements to the methodology used to measure congestion nationwide have produced the most detailed picture yet of a problem that is growing worse in all 437 of the nation's urban areas. The current report is based on 2005 figures, the most recent year for which complete data was available.

Transportation Safety Advancement Group

The Transportation Safety Advancement Group (TSAG) serves as a forum for providing public safety technologies guidance to the US Department of Transportation, ITS Joint Program Office. TSAG is an assembly of multi-discipline public safety professionals sharing a common interest in its technology for public safety charter. TSAG volunteers represent eight communities of interest including Academic & Research, Emergency Communications, Emergency Management, Emergency Medical Services, Fire & Rescue, Law Enforcement, Technology & Telematics and Transportation Operations.

Through alliances with like-interest partners, TSAG works to advance a national dialogue on transportation and public safety, toward optimizing traveler, operator and emergency responder safety on our nation’s roadways. www.tsag-its.org.





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